What is your longest time in between song listenings? (Part II)

8 February 2013

I finally heard this one again after a gap of at least 35 years – been looking for it for decades.

Thanks Gilbert!

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26 January 2013

I only remember the following song as “The Yang Song” since it must be the Malay song that has the most occurences of the word “yang” in its lyrics. For the first time in 27 years, I heard Haliza’s Kelahiran Cinta (1985) again today.

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5 December 2012

For me, previously it was about 34 years with Agnes Chan’s Sweet Dreams.

Earlier today, that record was broken.

When I was very young, there’s a tune which stuck to my head, and since then I’ve looked high and low for it for many years.

I don’t know why I didn’t think of it before, but a few days ago I finally got round to playing, on guitar, what I remembered, recorded it, and put it up on youtube:

Since I knew it is a waltz instrumental with a wind section at the beginning followed by violins, I then posted this on classical music forum talkclassical.com, and in 29 MINUTES user Chibiabos83 replied with the answer which I’d been looking for, for what must have been at least 35 years.

So, behold, the Elizabethan Serenade, a light music tune written by British composer Ronald Binge (1910-1979) in 1951 (?) and performed by The Ronald Binge Orchestra, apparently in 1953:

Another version by Ron Goodwin’s orchestra, somewhat shorter, apparently taken from the album This Is Ron Goodwin (1972):

I almost cried when I listened to it – like rediscovering a long lost family member – such a beautiful piece of music.

That’s it – I’m going to dig out everything about this song from now on – all the different versions etc.

It was first played by the Mantovani orchestra in 1951, with title “Andante cantabile”, but its original name is “The Man In The Street”, and was later changed “to reflect the optimism of the new Elizabethan age beginning with the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1952.”

This is Binge’s most popular composition. It was used by the BBC as the theme for the 1950s series Music Tapestry, and was also used by the British Forces Network radio station.

Source
Wikipedia

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